laura rowe

Place in Time

Place in Time, with Sophie and Charlie

In these quieter weeks leading up to meeting our son, thoughts have been circling around how we can truly honour the place we find ourselves in.

I’ve carried on through feelings of strength and empowerment, fear and doubt, grounding and awakening, trust and disbelief, anxiety and calm. 

As women, as creatures really, we seem to habitually long for this place of peace where we’re seemingly living as the person we aspire to be, in the life we’ve dreamt of or finally achieved.

We distract ourselves so aggressively from where we currently are living and breathing, in pursuit of some vision lingering on the horizon. Determining that anything less than the woman standing proudly in that vision, isn’t complete.

Isn’t worthy of honouring. 

Isn’t worth spending the present moment with.

Isn’t enough. 

There are so many tools out there, promising to heal us or guide us to some place on enlightenment and inspiration. I practice so many of them myself and know the value they hold. 

However, I wonder if instead of seeking and healing, we can simply begin to honour the place we find ourselves.

To feel the emotions naturally materializing in us.

To invite them in. To sit with them. To not necessarily give them great significance but rather recognize that they are us. That we are complete within them. We don’t need to figure them out or change them in anyway, we just need to feel them and release them when it’s time. 

If I told you you’re already the woman you aspire to be, would you find truth in that?

I remember watching the softness in Sophie’s smile while she nursed her new son Charlie. There was this wisdom pouring out of her, a knowing that there was nowhere else she needed to be, nothing more she could give. A vulnerability in which she was living presently and wholly.

Offering herself in her entirety to this new life. 

I wonder in which ways we can learn to honour our place in time, through every emotion and in each experience we find ourselves in. Motherhood (one of the biggest transitions in our life), following birth (the single most intense work a woman’s body will ever do) offers us a unique place of recreating our mindset.

Maybe we can begin there, begin to transform our way of thought and tread a bit more gently.

I asked Sophie a few questions after spending an afternoon with her.

Use a few words to describe the place you find yourself in or the emotions that seem to be most prominent.

The journey to becoming a mom has taught me more about myself than I have learned in my 31 years.

I didn't know what kind of strength I had until I brought a little soul into this world, but I also did not know just how challenging the journey would be. Right now I am completely vulnerable and trying to be open to all of the new experiences, appreciating that I won't have many of the answers that I need.

I guess in one word I feel vulnerable. While I rediscover who I am, I am trying my best to stay open minded and keep those closest to me close. 

 

How can you honor this place?

I am doing my best to let it all sink in.

I do not want to wish time away or want to get to the next stage of motherhood. I am trying to live slowly and remind myself (especially on the hard days) that everything is temporary and to enjoy all of the moments. This time as a new mom is fleeting and I really am trying my best to hold on to it by reminding myself just how quickly it goes by.

And as for not having all of the answers, I keep reminding myself that we're all just doing the best we can; what I see on social media is just someone's highlight reel - we're all facing challenges in being new mothers.

Do you trust that you are already the woman you yearn to be and that you’re already becoming the best version of yourself?

I like to think of myself as a work in progress.

I am beyond amazed at how much I have grown and changed in the few short months since becoming a mom. I want to be the best version of myself for my family and whoever that is, I think it will just keep evolving as I grow. 

Laura RoweComment